IDP.Generic – Is it a Virus and How to Remove It?

Media App Library section shows Downloaded Apps

Several users are getting the IDP.Generic warning from their antivirus software. This happens when your antivirus detects a potentially malicious file or the antivirus program’s database needs to be updated.

In most cases, it is a false positive, meaning it falsely detects malware when the file is legitimate. But other times, it may be a sign of malware on your system.

This guide will help you figure out whether or not to worry about this warning, what causes it, how you got it, and how to remove it.

What is IDP.Generic?

IDP stands for identity theft protection. It is not a single threat; it is a common threat name used to denote identity theft malware.

Avast and AVG antiviruses for iOS, Android, Microsoft Windows, and macOS use this threat label to detect software that can cause identity theft. Such software can seem legit but have a trojan that provides backdoor access to hackers.

However, this doesn’t necessarily mean that the program is a virus. In some cases, it can be a false positive.

How can you tell a virus apart from a false positive?

It’s always a good idea to scan your computer with a reliable anti-malware program to be sure. Then, if you find the same threat while scanning with another software, you can be reasonably sure that it is a virus.

Also, check the location of the file your antivirus flagged. If the file is located in the temp or the downloaded folder, it is more likely to be an actual virus.

Additionally, if the infected file is an executable (.exe), it is more likely to be a virus (unless it’s from a trusted source).

What causes idp.generic warnings?

You can receive IDP.Generic warnings because the antivirus program’s database needs to be updated. You should make sure to update your antivirus program regularly.

You may also have a virus on your computer, and the antivirus program has correctly identified it. In this case, you’ll need to take action to remove the virus from your computer.

How did the IDP.Generic virus enter my computer?

If you download files from untrustworthy websites, they may host malicious files, such as cracked games or programs, keygens, etc., that contain viruses or other malicious code. When you open these files, they can damage your computer by corrupting or stealing your data.

IDP.Generic viruses may also be distributed via email attachments or messages asking you to click on a link. These messages usually look like they come from a legitimate website or company, but if you look closely, you may notice spelling mistakes or other oddities.

How to remove IDP.Generic

The first step is to scan your computer with another anti-malware program. For this job, you can use Malwarebytes. Download and install it on your computer, then perform a scan.

Perform a scan.
Perform a scan.

If you didn’t find a threat

If you didn’t find the IDP.Generic threat while scanning, it is most likely a false positive, and you need to take the file out of the virus vault in your old antivirus because it is blocking a safe file.

  1. Open your antivirus software. In my case, it is Avast. You might also be using the native Windows Defender.
  2. Go to Protection.

    Head to Protection.
    Head to Protection.

  3. Click Virus Chest.

    Click Virus Chest.
    Click Virus Chest.

  4. Mark the deleted file, click the there dots icons, and choose Restore.

    Choose Restore.
    Choose Restore.

If you found the same threat

If you found IDP.Generic threat while scanning, you should delete it. As we scanned the threat using MalwareBytes, we will use the software to delete IDP.Generic. Check the box next to the threat and click Quarantine.

Click Quarantine.
Click Quarantine.

Malwarebytes will quarantine the detected threat, which removes its ability to infect your computer.

Malwarebytes scan.
Malwarebytes scan.

Additional safety measures

Delete the unwanted software

If you have any untrusted or unknown programs installed, remove them from your computer. These programs may be the ones causing the IDP.Generic warnings.

To remove a program from your computer:

  1. Open Control Panel.

    Open the Control Panel.
    Open the Control Panel.

  2. Select Uninstall a program under Programs.

    Click Uninstall a Program.
    Click Uninstall a Program.

  3. Right-click the unwanted program and select Uninstall.

    Click Uninstall.
    Click Uninstall.

Delete temporary files

Identity theft viruses often hide in temporary files, so it’s important to delete these files from your computer.

  1. Open the Start Menu and search for “Disc Cleanup”

    Open Disk Cleanup.
    Open Disk Cleanup.

  2. Open the program, select the drive you want to clean, and click OK. As the C: drive is the system drive for most users, I recommend selecting it.

    Select the C drive.
    Select the C drive.

  3. Deselect everything and select Temporary Internet Files and Temporary Files. Click OK.

    Click Ok.
    Click OK.

  4.  Click Delete Files to confirm your action.

    Click Delete Files.
    Click Delete Files.

Reset your browser

Identity theft viruses could hijack your browser’s settings and keep tracking your activity. IDP.Generic could have been caused by a browser add-on or extension. In these cases, you should reset the browsers to their default settings to clean them completely. For example, here is how to reset Microsoft Edge.

  1. Open Microsoft Edge, click the three dots in the top right corner of the screen, then click Settings.

    Press Settings.
    Press Settings.

  2. Click Reset settings from the left sidebar.

    Click Reset settings.
    Click Reset settings.

  3. Hit Restore settings to their default values, then confirm your action by clicking Reset.

    Hit Restore settings to their default values.
    Select Restore settings to their default values, then click Reset.

Erik is a full-time product quality engineer at the IBM who has a passion for teaching others (and always learning) about technology. He has a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science and Engineering from Eindhoven University of Technology. Erik is the chief editor for Windows, Linux and coding tutorials.

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